Mini Paleo Sweet Potato Pies (or Pumpkin Pies)

Mini Paleo Sweet Potato Pies (or Pumpkin Pies) Trick or treat ??? definitely a treat- read on These mini paleo sweet potato pies have the enthusiastic approval of six yoga teachers, two paleo bloggers, two cousins, one aunt, one uncle, and, me. When the beta version of the recipe was shared with the above, they all said, “this is definitely a blog-worthy recipe.” I think it is one of the most blog-worthy recipes I’ve made in a while, in fact. The creamy, silky filling pairs beautifully with the shortbread-like crust. Even better, prep is easier than a traditional pie because you don’t need to roll out the dough. And it cooks in half the time. Win win! About the ingredients Tigernut flour – Tigernut is the new “in” superfood. It’s not a nut, it’s a grain-free flour made from nutrient-dense tubers. It lends a naturally sweet, nutty, toasty flavor and shortbread texture to this pie crust. I’ve written about the nutrition benefits of tigernuts here. Tigernut flour is not available in many stores (yet), but you can find it here on Amazon. Sweet potato puree – You can make your own sweet potato puree from roasted sweet potatoes, and I highly recommend my technique for getting the perfect roasted sweet potato every time. Alternatively, I recommend this organic canned sweet potato puree. Alternatively, you can use fresh or canned pumpkin puree to make mini pumpkin pies. Coconut butter – Don’t confused coconut butter with coconut oil. It’s the same difference as almond butter and almond oil. I have a post about the various uses of coconut butter here, if you are wondering what else to...

Protein Focused Nutrition

Find out what is Protein, do you really know? This ebook has been written by Martin Rooney, MD of Focused Nutrition to help improve our knowledge and understanding when it comes to our own nutrition. There are further books available on related nutritional...

Bespoke Food Manufacturer

Focused Nutrition prides itself on being a bespoke food manufacturer and supplying wholesome, healthy products for people on the move, who are always busy. We know that each business is different, with different preferences and needs and we respect that your vision is unique to you. We work collaboratively with businesses to make a vision into a reality. As a leading flapjack manufacturer and other nutritional products we have the experience and knowledge to help your business create a healthy range of snacks. Your expectations are our expectations. We want to take what you’ve envisioned your product to smell like, taste like and look like, from the product itself to the packaging, and create something you’ll be proud to sell. Focused Nutrition will be there to help guide you through, from an initial discussion with Martin, the Director of the company, to presenting your existing ideas and building upon these. Together we will discuss the aims you have in terms of product, formulation and pricing. To ensure the product is exactly what you’d hoped for we would conduct trials and offer our expertise along the way. As a company who specialise in creating delicious, nutritious handmade flapjacks, we are of course skilled in our specialised area of baking. Of course once you’ve created the perfect product you will need to get it out there! Focused Nutrition also has technical services available to support you through marketing your new product. We are keen to work with wholesalers, distributors and retailers – forward thinking businesses – who want to grow their success on a closer relationship with our customer-focused organisation. Likewise...

What are the implications to your health?

How much does it cost to eat healthily? It’s no secret that in today’s society the majority of us feel strapped for time and money, challenges which can lead to poor diet choices. The convenience of processed, ready prepared food can at the end of the day seem all too tempting, opposed to cooking from scratch. Whilst it may be true that healthier food can cost more than junk food, what are the implications to your health? Last year a report into the widening gap in costs between fresh foods and processed found that healthy foods could cost up to three times as much as unhealthy alternatives. This may be so but at what cost is this to your health? The long term implications that we should eat cheaper, quicker processed food to save a bit of money and time, completely ignores the effect this can have on your health and wellbeing. There are simple steps to take to reduce the cost and to also eat a healthy and balanced diet. Not only is it really satisfying to make a meal from scratch but you’ll be reaping in the rewards on the health side of things! I made my own pasta the other day, whilst not something I plan on doing every week, I could really taste the difference by cooking fresh. Staple foods like tinned beans and pulses are super cheap and can really help pad a meal out. Try using different types such as chickpeas, butterbeans, and black eyed peas and add to stews, soups and pasta or curry dishes. These are a great source of protein...

Protein Nutrition

Protein is one of the main food groups we need in our diets to stay in tip top condition, as you likely already know from that big poster on the wall that every primary school in the country seemed to have next to the canteen (despite the canteen never having anything more than dinosaur shaped mystery meat nuggets). It helps us with a number of things, from weight management to feeling satisfied after a meal and overall keeping us healthy. It’s usually found in animal products but vegans and vegetarians can get protein from sources such as tofu and vegetables. Protein Focused Nutrition has many benefits including:  Repair and Regeneration  Weight Management  Muscle building  Chronic Disease Prevention  Health Maintenance Where does it come from? It comes in different forms, complete and incomplete. We can find protein in meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, beans and legumes, tofu, soy products and nuts. Complete proteins provide the body with all the amino acids we need, which is what protein is broken down to in the body, these are vital for muscle building and repairing and regenerating our bones and skin. Meat, fish, poultry and dairy all come under complete proteins, as do eggs and grains such as quinoa and cous cous. Other grains, such as those found in cereals, beans, vegetables, seeds and nuts don’t provide all the protein we need. You can of course combine incomplete proteins to ensure you get the benefits of eating a portion of a complete protein, eating a chilli for example – with kidney beans and rice. How do you choose?!...