Maintaining protein levels for everyday health and wellness

Maintaining protein levels for everyday health and wellness

Mention protein and you think of energy. There is no shortage of discussion among athletes and sports stars about the importance of maintaining protein levels to optimise performance. Yet the role of protein in the human body is a fundamental one that goes beyond performance on the football field or shaving another one hundredth of a second off that 100-metre time. Macro and micro nutrients The human body needs a variety of nutrients in order to stay healthy, These are divided into macronutrients, of which we need relatively large amounts, and micronutrients. The micronutrients are vitamins and minerals, while the macronutrients are carbohydrates, fat and protein. When it comes to carbohydrates and fat, the body has clever ways of taking reserve supplies on board and holding them in storage. With protein, it is different, however – the body can only take it through what it eats, and when it is gone, it is gone. The importance of maintaining protein levels Protein is a component of each and every cell in the body. It is a building block of blood, skin, bone and muscle and the body uses it to carry out basic functions and to create body chemicals, enzymes and hormones. There are a number of symptoms that might manifest if you are not getting enough protein. The following list contains five of the more common, but is by no means exhaustive. Fatigue – that mid-afternoon energy slump is a common sign that protein levels are getting low. A top up with a nutritious snack or shake that is protein rich can be just the pick-me-up you need. Brain...

Protein Nutrition

Protein is one of the main food groups we need in our diets to stay in tip top condition, as you likely already know from that big poster on the wall that every primary school in the country seemed to have next to the canteen (despite the canteen never having anything more than dinosaur shaped mystery meat nuggets). It helps us with a number of things, from weight management to feeling satisfied after a meal and overall keeping us healthy. It’s usually found in animal products but vegans and vegetarians can get protein from sources such as tofu and vegetables. Protein Focused Nutrition has many benefits including:  Repair and Regeneration  Weight Management  Muscle building  Chronic Disease Prevention  Health Maintenance Where does it come from? It comes in different forms, complete and incomplete. We can find protein in meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, beans and legumes, tofu, soy products and nuts. Complete proteins provide the body with all the amino acids we need, which is what protein is broken down to in the body, these are vital for muscle building and repairing and regenerating our bones and skin. Meat, fish, poultry and dairy all come under complete proteins, as do eggs and grains such as quinoa and cous cous. Other grains, such as those found in cereals, beans, vegetables, seeds and nuts don’t provide all the protein we need. You can of course combine incomplete proteins to ensure you get the benefits of eating a portion of a complete protein, eating a chilli for example – with kidney beans and rice. How do you choose?!...

Breaking News! Paleo and Steak

Paleo and Steak This is a recipe from Rebel Chef Noel Fernando. When people think of the Paleo Diet, it seems like the first thing that comes to mind is a big, juicy steak. (Okay, so maybe bacon is first. Then steak.) Many of us do love steak, but are afraid of trying to cook it at home. A nice piece of meat, even at the grocery store, can be expensive, so we don’t want to risk over-cooking or seasoning incorrectly. I understand where your fears are coming from, friends, and I’m here to talk you through it. Believe me, steak intimidated me for a long time. If you’ve been wanting to try cooking your own steak at home, this recipe couldn’t be any simpler. Get ready to level up your cooking game and make yourself gosh darn proud! This steak is super easy. It takes 15 minutes and only uses 4 ingredients. Enough talking. Let’s get to cooking! Ingredients & Equipment: Basic Steak: Prep Time: 5 min Cook Time: 3 min Serves: 2 1 steak (1/2 lb or 226g per person) – if this is your first time cooking a steak, get a ribeye. It’s hard to go wrong with this cut. Ribeyes are well-marbled, tender pieces of meat, with a mid-range price. If you can afford it, spring for grass fed beef. It tastes better. An ideal ribeye is about an inch thick. Some places give you the option of bone-in or boneless. I usually go with boneless, but this is just personal preference. 1/2 Tbsp (7.3 ml) butter or ghee – ghee has a higher smoke...